Why the Structural Changes to the VC Industry Matter

The Micro and Macro of Mobile

Disrupting Payments, Africa Style

Mobile Leverage

How to Ruin Your Company with One Bad Process

“Real quick, whole squad on that real sh*t
0 to 100, n***a, real quick”
—Drake, “
0 to 100/The Catch Up

.

I am a giant advocate for technical founders running their own companies, but one consistent way that technical founders deeply harm their businesses is by screwing up the budgeting process. Yes, the budgeting process. How ridiculous is that? How does it happen and why is it particularly problematic for engineers? I’ll begin by describing how I screwed it up in my company… MORE

12 Things I Learned From Marc Andreessen

.

The basic math component is that there are about 4,000 startups a year that are founded in the technology industry which would like to raise venture capital and we can invest in about 20… MORE

Do You Feel Pressure or Do You Apply Pressure?

“To whoever think their words affect me is too stupid
And if you can do it better than me, then you do it”
—Kanye West,
“Cold”

One obvious yet under-appreciated law of business physics is: For any given company, the larger the company becomes, the more opportunities emerge to screw it up.

Another obvious, but not well understood law: The more screwed up your company, the more people will complain about it and blame you.

If we take these two together, it is easy to see that without intervention the larger your company becomes, the more people will complain and blame you.

This seems simple enough, but CEOs often fail to understand the logic, become overwhelmed by the criticism, lose confidence in themselves, and decide that they are no longer capable of running their own companies. This can be tragic as I explained in “Why We Prefer Founding CEOs”.

If you are a logical and open-minded person, it is difficult not to take a 10X increase in criticism seriously. More importantly, it’s difficult not to take a 10X increase in criticism personally. So how can a CEO keep from getting ground into sawdust by complaints from her own people? The answer comes from a simple CEO aphorism: You either apply pressure or you feel pressure. MORE

Powered by WordPress.com VIP